The Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care

Module Learning Outcomes

Module 1: Theory 1

Aim

This module provides an overview of the physiology of altitude and diseases likely to occur in the mountain environment. It also introduces key practical skills required for survival and mountain rescue.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module students will be able to:

  1. Manage the specific illnesses and diseases that are likely to occur in the mountain environment
  2. Explain the physiological changes that occur on travelling to altitude
  3. Explain the physiological changes associated with exercise at altitude and contrast these with the effects of exercise at sea level
  4. Be proficient in the practical skills of survival and mountain rescue

Teaching and Learning Methods

  • Teaching and learning methods include lectures, practical classes and demonstrations, small group tutorials, scenario based teaching, simulation and role play.
  • Self-directed study, learning activities and guided reading provided through the VLE, are undertaken before the taught part of the module.

Assessment Methods

  • Short answer exam paper.
  • Summative assessment of practical skills during field work and seminars. Practical skills assessments will be undertaken by qualified UIAGM guides according to accepted UIAGM methods and standards.

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Module 2: Mountain Skills

Pre-requisites: Module 1

Aim

The focus of this module is mountain skills and the assessment and rescue of a simulated casualty.

Learning Outcomes

  1. At the end of this module students should be able to:
  2. Discuss the effects of cold and other adverse weather conditions on people.
  3. Perform patient assessment and rescue of a simulated casualty in winter conditions.
  4. Describe different navigation techniques and aids and navigate efficiently to find a patient, tent or snow hole in poor visibility in a white out in winter.
  5. Build a variety of emergency snow shelters such as snow hole, shovel up or igloo and critique the strengths and uses of these.
  6. Construct a variety of belays on snow, rock and ice. Explain the use of these and justify their selection in different circumstances.
  7. Interpret a weather map and describe the effect of mountains on weather patterns.
  8. Demonstrate basic knowledge of snow safety and avalanche prediction and safety.
  9. Undertake avalanche rescue searches with and without avalanche transceivers and critique different avalanche safety devices
  10. Move safely on snow and ice.

Teaching and Learning Methods

  • Teaching and learning methods include practical classes and demonstrations, small group tutorials, scenario based teaching, simulation and role play.
  • Informal seminars are held in the evenings, and there are a number of formal lectures.
  • Self-directed study, learning activities and guided reading provided through the VLE, are undertaken before the taught part of the module.

Assessment Methods

  • Practical skills assessed by competency based assessments and practical demonstrations.
  • Integrated knowledge and practical skills assessed by simulation and scenario based assessment.

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Module 3: Theory 2

Pre-requisites: Module 1

Aim

This module aims to introduce the broader aspects of travel medicine and applies this to the specifics of providing care and advice to patients travelling to high altitude.

Learning Outcomes

  1. At the end of this module, applicants will be able to:Undertake a detailed travel medicine history.
  2. Identify risk factors and indications of travel related illness.
  3. Evaluate and recommend current immunisation and prophylatic therapy required for common travel destinations
  4. Apply the basic principles of managing pre-existing medical conditions in travellers to altitude, including providing advice about the effects of these on altitude related activities and altitude related illness
  5. Discuss the basic principles of the management of fever on expeditions and apply these principles to a number of given scenarios.
  6. Explain the diagnosis and management of malaria and the use of anti-malarial drugs.
  7. Describe the principle features of common and important maxillofacial or dental injuries that may occur at altitude
  8. Demonstrate swift water crossing, and evaluate the different approaches to swift water search and rescue.
  9. Discuss the medico legal issues of working at high altitude locations, and of giving advice to patients travelling to high altitude.
  10. Discuss the management of communications and media for expeditions.
  11. Describe the role of mountain rescue services in the UK and how to work safely around a helicopter.

Teaching and Learning Methods

  • Teaching and learning methods include lectures, practical classes and demonstrations, small group tutorials, scenario based teaching, simulation and role play.
  • Self-directed study, learning activities and guided reading provided through the VLE, are undertaken before the taught part of the module.

Assessment Methods

  • Short answer exam paper.
  • Summative assessment of practical skills. Practical skills assessments will be undertaken by qualified UIAGM guides according to accepted UIAGM methods and standards.

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Module 4: Alpine Skills

Pre-requisites: Modules 1-3

Aim

This module builds on skills developed earlier in the programme and aims to enhance rescue skills in alpine environments.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module, applicants will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate skills and knowledge to safely assess and manage a casualty or casualties in the mountain environment.
  2. Organise team members to undertake a casualty rescue in a variety of situations (For example on steep ground, in a crevasse). Assess likely dangers and justify decisions made.
  3. Perform a primary survey of a simulated casualty, administer appropriate therapy in the field and complete a casualty report.
  4. Demonstrate a crevasse rescue of a colleague, using a safe approach and employing suitable recognised techniques to perform this efficiently and safely. Critique the options available and justify their selection.
  5. Demonstrate safe travel over crevassed ground.
  6. Select appropriate personal equipment (including first aid kit) for the field work being undertaken, and justify their selection.

Teaching and Learning Methods

  • This module is taught in the field in the European Alps.
  • Teaching and learning methods include practical classes and demonstrations, small group tutorials, scenario based teaching, simulation and role play.
  • Informal seminars are held in the evenings, but there are no formal lectures.
  • Self-directed study, learning activities and guided reading provided through the VLE are undertaken before the taught part of the module.

Assessment Methods

  • Practical skills assessed by competency based assessments and practical demonstrations.
  • Integrated knowledge and practical skills assessed by simulation and scenario based assessment.

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Module 5: Research Methods

Pre-requisites: Module 1

Aim

The aim of this module is to provide students with research knowledge and skills to evaluate and use research effectively, undertake a small scale research project and apply these to the Mountain Medicine context.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module, applicants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the significance of major high altitude research expeditions and experiments that have contributed to our current knowledge base.
  2. Compare and contrast the benefits and limitations of field experiments and chamber studies.
  3. Understand and demonstrate the basic research methods that have been used in high altitude research.
  4. Analyse simple data from high altitude studies, selecting and using appropriate statistical techniques and qualitative and quantitative methods
  5. Generate an appropriate research hypothesis and design a research study to test this.
  6. Critique the practical and ethical difficulties of undertaking high altitude research.
  7. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of altitude related reference sources and be able to use them in the appropriate assignments.
  8. Critically appraise current research literature relating to Mountain Medicine.

Teaching and Learning Methods

  • This module is delivered entirely online through the VLE. Self-directed learning and guided reading is undertaken during the module and in preparation for the assessment.

Assessment Methods

  • Students are summatively assessed through submission of a formal research proposal.

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Module 6: Best Bets Clinical Review

Pre-requisites: Module 5

Aim

The aim of this module is to explore the application of evidence-based medicine in mountain medicine. Using the methodology developed by Best Bets, students develop evidence based recommendations for best practice for a mountain medicine topic.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students will use the Best Bets methodology to be able to:

  1. Research a clinical question to identify relevant literature
  2. Evaluate the literature to answer the clinical question
  3. Develop recommendations for best clinical practice in relation to a clinical question

Teaching and Learning Methods

  • Learning and teaching is completed online with support from an allocated tutor.

Assessment Methods

  • Students complete a Best Bets clinical review and submit it using the format stipulated.

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Module 7: Self-Directed Module 1

Pre-requisites: Modules 5-6

Aim

Students will select an area of interest or personal experience from the curriculum to study in more detail.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module, applicants will be able to:

  1. Undertake a small scale research, audit or investigative project.
  2. Evaluate mountain medicine data sources and evidence.
  3. Summarise and draw conclusions and if appropriate provide guidance/advice.
  4. Demonstrate sound knowledge of the mountain medicine body of evidence and its application in practice.

Teaching and Learning Methods

These module are completed using self-directed learning with supervision from Module Teaching Faculty. It is expected that students may also consult and work with other Faculty/Mentors during their studies. However, ultimate responsibility for assessment of the output, lies with the Module Teaching Faculty. It is expected that students will demonstrate evidence of significant reading in the chosen area and application of this in the assessment.

Assessment Methods

Students will submit a piece of work at an appropriate level. This should demonstrate:

  • Rigorous identification of the issue to be investigated/addressed and the design of suitable (research) questions.
  • A clearly described rationale and application of appropriate methods for the project.
  • Collection/evaluation/analysis of relevant data/literature.
  • Formulation of appropriate conclusions/recommendations.

The output should be approximately 2500-3000 words and can be in the form of a:

  • Report / piece of academic writing
  • Research article.
  • Audit project.
  • Reflective account (see below).

Other outputs such as posters/teaching materials can used to supplement the background report and should be discussed with and approved by the education/clinical lead.

A student can choose to write a "Reflective Account" as one of their Independent Study Modules if they so wish.

 

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Module 8: Self-Directed Module 2

Pre-requisites: Modules 5-6

Aim

Students will select an area of interest or personal experience from the curriculum to study in more detail.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this module, applicants will be able to:

  1. Undertake a small scale research, audit or investigative project.
  2. Evaluate mountain medicine data sources and evidence.
  3. Summarise and draw conclusions and if appropriate provide guidance/advice.
  4. Demonstrate sound knowledge of the mountain medicine body of evidence and its application in practice.

Teaching and Learning Methods

These module are completed using self-directed learning with supervision from Module Teaching Faculty. It is expected that students may also consult and work with other Faculty/Mentors during their studies. However, ultimate responsibility for assessment of the output, lies with the Module Teaching Faculty. It is expected that students will demonstrate evidence of significant reading in the chosen area and application of this in the assessment.

Assessment Methods

Students will submit a piece of work at an appropriate level. This should demonstrate:

  • Rigorous identification of the issue to be investigated/addressed and the design of suitable (research) questions.
  • A clearly described rationale and application of appropriate methods for the project.
  • Collection/evaluation/analysis of relevant data/literature.
  • Formulation of appropriate conclusions/recommendations.

The output should be approximately 2500-3000 words and can be in the form of a:

  • Report / piece of academic writing
  • Research article.
  • Audit project.
  • Reflective account (see below).

Other outputs such as posters/teaching materials can used to supplement the background report and should be discussed with and approved by the education/clinical lead.

A student can choose to write a "Reflective Account" as one of their Independent Study Modules if they so wish.

 

Back to Module List

 

Upcoming System Maintenance & Network Disruption

Due to essential systems maintenance and upgrades there will be intermittent interruptions to some on-line services on Saturday 27th of February. There will be further interruption to some core services on Wednesday 2nd and Thursday 3rd of March.

We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

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